Writing

Organization: Trello

Last time I talked about my bullet journal and how it helps me stay organized. This time, welcome to Trello hell!

As with bullet journaling, I'm not here to say that this is the best and only way to stay organized you gotta try it. It's just a tool that has lent itself to a few of my needs when it comes to writing.

No more talking, let's look at some sexy organization.

What's Trello?

Trello is basically the online equivalent of a wall covered in Post-It notes.

You have a board! On the board you can make columns. Then you organize cards in these columns. The cards can store information and checklists. They can be assigned to people, given due dates, or labelled.

Most importantly, they can be moved around. Right now I use one board for all my writing tasks, but that may change. More on that later.

How Trello helps me

Right now I use Trello to track writing projects three months out. My first three columns are January, February, and March.

Now, my workload isn't super heavy. Under January I have one big thing going on: editing my NaNo 2017 project, which we'll call DTD.

In February, I have a cards for two other ongoing writing projects, as well as a card noting future scenes that I need to write into DTD.

I can see at a glance what I'm going to be working on after my current edits are done. But having those cards in the next month is less overwhelming for me than looking at a big to-do list. I can give myself breathing room by saying there's no expectation for me to tackle all these projects this month.

March is the projected released for Fool For You, where my short story A Spell For Luck will appear. As the date gets closer, I'll start jotting down promo ideas on that card and probably make a checklist for myself with reminders to tweet, post on Facebook, do a giveaway, etc. But again, I don't need to worry about that yet!

What's on a card?

Mild spoilers, I guess.

On the card for my edits, I have a checklist. These are all problems I noted when I was writing DTD, but I couldn't fix them during NaNo. I love checklists, and especially love that Trello's checklists come with a progress bar and the ability to hide completed items.

So, what if I don't finish everything I want to do by the end of January?

Well, I'll just move this card into the February column. Then I rename the "January" column to "April," move it down the row, and start populating it with April tasks. I could add more months, but so far I haven't really needed to. But uh, I do have other columns! Let's see.


It's a resource bank

Wow!

First up, we have my "Tabled" column. These are projects I'm not working on right now. I don't want them floating around in my monthly to-dos and giving me anxiety.

I condensed things ever further by making a card called BOOK GRAVEYARD which is where I keep titles of projects that I'm not totally ready to let go of just yet, but I also don't want to see their horrible little faces on my board reminding me of my failure. They live in the graveyard now, which I'll occasionally open and then grimace at. 

The "Website" column is all upkeep. I keep lists of blog posts I want to write and newsletters I want to send. I curate my reading lists here too, so that when it's time to write them I can remember what books I wanted to include.

In the "References" column I keep useful links. I never use bookmarks, and it's easiest for me to keep writing-related links in the place where I do the rest of my ... writing-thinking ... ya know.

More in-depth editing

I've used Trello for more intensive editing and writing projects before, and it actually worked great. I made a little mock-up of that process.

I would make a board for the book, and then a column where I stored cards corresponding to each chapter. I labelled the chapters with colors corresponding to the character's POV (this was a multi-POV book). On each card I had a chapter summary, what the goal of that chapter was, and a checklist of things I needed to edit — or just things I needed to look out for.

That might have been fact-checking something I was unsure about, or making sure that a character was having the correct emotional reaction.

This system worked really well for me, and I'll probably return to it when my workload is heavier than it is now.

Wrap-up

That's my Trello process! If you're interested in more about my writing process, check out the links below. This is an ever-evolving chaos for me, but it's fun to think about, and hopefully fun to read about too.